Altarpiece, Biblical & European Panel Painting Art | Expert Attribution & Authentication | International Investigation Researchers | Triptych, Italian, French, German, Flemish Renaissance, Medieval

HOME
CONTACT

 

  Freemanart are expert in conducting complex attribution and authentication investigations and in effecting international archival research into European altarpiece & early Biblical panel paintings.

 We undertake wide ranging investigations, conducting both academic in-depth studies, alongside provenance research and utilise a variety of forensic applications in the specialised field of altarpiece art. Establishing internationally accepted artist and workshop attributions.

 Freemanart have specialist professionals with specific expertise in European altarpiece art and European religious panel paintings of all forms, including;

Triptych; Paintings made up of three sections, often hinged together and attached to either side of a central panel. These range from small works for domestic devotion, to major altarpieces.


Diptichs,; Two hinged wooden panels which can be closed like a book and the more complex and elaborate Polyptych. Multi-panelled, dynamic altarpieces and screens. Uually depicting the holy family or individual saints set against a celestial gold background within an intricate Gothic architectural frameworks. In the main these are painted by the most important workshops & artists. Many such works of art have in time become separated and are thought to be single paintings which appear in collections. We investigate many leading to positive attributions.

 

Freemanart's Mathew Freeman examines the “Coronation of the Virgin” by Jacopo di Cione at the Galleria dell’Accademia in Florence.

 

 

 

 

 

Ocagna's Marble, lapis lazuli, gold

and glass inlay Tabernacle.
Orsanmichele, Florence

 We also have scholars with particular expertise and knowledge of Italian altarpiece paintings, including the Sienese, Florentine and Roman schools, but also in French, Flemish and German religious iconography and altarpice art.

 Most altarpieces date from about the year 1000 onwards, when a religious shrine was relocated to a more formal place and where the altar was to become the focal point of the church.
Altar panel-paintings became common in Europe from about the 15th century and were created by artists and their studio workers using either oil paint or egg tempera. This was applied to wooden panels set in decorative and often highly elaborate, architectural gilded frames which formed part of the churches chrerished decoration.

 

 In 1359, Andrea di Cione di Arcangelo (c. 1308 – August 25, 1368), better known as Orcagna - a painter, sculptor and architect - executed the only significant, large-scale sculpture of the time in the city of Florence. The mammoth tabernacle for Orsanmichele. [Seen here to the left.]

 

 Altarpiece iconography and its subject matter is formally linked to Biblical art, specifically featuring the Holy Family and respective Saints. It also contained large areas of expensive gilding to both the frame and the picture itself.

The amount of gold leaf was determined by the patron of the work, who set both the price for the undertaking, its size, manner and the subject matter, according to their status, the positioning and reason for its undertaking, liunked to the depth of his pocket.

 

 

 

 

 

 The demands placed upon artists by their patrons who commissioned the work was such, that a recognised image consistency of the characters depicted in the panel painting was demanded. As such the artist needed to refer backwards to other artist's representations as examples. Such as saints and other figures for their own likenesses.

 

 A good example is  the likeness of Mary Magdalene [to the right] when placed side by side with another example of the same saint, painted by Lippo d'Andrea di Lippo.

 In the first - the left side image, painted in about 1360 and from the di Cione studio and workshop, is the right hand panel of a unified altarpiece, now a Triptych and one which we were investigating in Florence, for a private Swiss collector.

Some 70 years hence in about 1430 Lippo d'Andrea creates his predella, [Below]

for the Chiesa di Santa Maria degli Angiolini.

'Enthroned Madonna and Child with Saints Catherine of Alexandria, Francis, Zanobius and Mary Magdalene.

 

He took his likeness from somewhere?

 

 

 

 

 

^Lippo

 

 

BELOW: Here she is again, this time on the ceiling of

the church of  Orsanmichele completed in 1404

  Here in this complex 'predella' above, the scale, reality and relationship of the composition is not paramount. The story and how it links however is.

 

  In the creation of altarpiece art, masters were assisted by pupils and other members of the workshop in their difficult and complex preparation. Each had specific technical abilities and skills. 

Modern technical analysis and x-radiography have deepened our understanding of this process, allowing for a closre examination of the materials and techniques used by the artist and his studio which helps us in the attribution process.

 In the gilding itself there are also clues to the artists who created them. There is a consistency of the  metal stamps used by different studios and the punch marks themselves are often formidable comparative indicators in considering and artist attribution.

 

 

 

 

Cranach Reformation Altar St. Mary's Church , Wittenberg, Germany
Master of Moulins (Jean Hey), Bourbon Altarpiece French, 1498. Moulins Cathedral
   

 

    

 

 

 

EXPERT IN THE FINE ART OF AUTHENTICATION

Expert de l'oeuvrede

 

 The Freemanart Consultancy specialise in art authentication investigations and artist attribution research and have experts who specialise in the study of Northern European altarpiece, panel paintings and biblical art.

 We are specifically here to assist you with the pursuit of the truth in art attribution, authentication and provenance issues and due diligence enquiries.

 

Before you begin any art authentication or attribution investigation:

* Before entering into a full investigation of the legitimacy of a work of art, be it academic, forensic or as with most cases, both, it is essential to know if the project is viable and in the long term can likely be proven.

Much as you would need to know if you were taking a legal case to court. Logically, if it is not, you should not attempt it, as the risk of failure is too high.

 So we prefer to make a preliminary and vital professional pre authentication assessment for clients first. This is based upon the images you supply, the details and the items provenance and history.

This is a logical & cost effective professional assessment and advisory for which there is a modest set fee.

Please see our FAQ's which explains the process in detail.

 

To Contact Freemanart Click Here:

 

 

 

 
LINKS TO SPECIALISMS / GENRES
 
     

OLD MASTER ART

EUROPEAN ART - AUTHENTICATION
SCOTTISH ART
ITALIAN ART
CUBAN ART AUTHENTICATION
 

 

 

     
     
Specialist Expertise by Artist
     

PICASSO PABLO

APPEL KAREL
BRANCUSI SCULPTURE AUTHENTICATION
BOUDIN EUGENE
CEZANNE PAUL
CHAGALL MARC
CORNEILLE & the COBRA MOVEMENT
MONDRIAN PIET
PISSARRO CAMILLE
VAN GOGH 
SPENLOVE-SPENLOVE
KIRCHNER ERNST LUDWIG
CORNELIUS KRIEGHOFF
JOAN MIRO
 
     

BEYOND WILDENSTEIN - THE  GAUGUIN INDEX

1871-1884 | 1885- 1888 1889 - 1890 | 1891 - 1893 | 1894 - 1896 | 1897 - 1899 | 1900 - 1903

 
CURRENT INVESTIGATIONS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Altarpiece Art – Expert Attribution & Authentication Investigation | European religious panel painting researchers | Triptych - Italian Renaissance, Northern Renaissance, Late Gothic, and Counter-Reformation

altarpiece, triptych, authentication, icon, religious, art, painting, panel painting, European, northern European, church, altarpieces,Sienese, Florentine, Florence, Rome, Roman, Italian, Italian altarpiece, German Altarpiece, French altar piece, Flemish altarpiece, Andrea di Cione, Okaying, Biblical art, saint, holy family, Madonna, child, Magdalene, predella,
Investigate, investigator, investigators, attribution, studio,
northern European workshop, analysis, research, researchers, international,

European Altarpiece art attribution & investigation services.12th, 13th, 14th, 15th. 16th. 17th, 18th century. Forensic and Academic research international